background

Filter By Category

A to Z Disease Directory
Drugs & Ingredients Section

Archives

Posted by -Dr-parag

A To Z Disease Directory / 27 May 2019

KAWASAKI DISEASE

ABSTRACT -

Kawasaki disease also known as Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome, a rare illness that causes inflammation of the blood vessels which affects arteries, veins, capillaries and also lymph nodes. It can also affect skin and the mucous membrane inside the mouth, nose and throat. This can give rise to heart disease in children for lifetime.

CAUSES -

The exact cause of Kawasaki is not identified yet, but certain factors can originate this condition:-
  • Genetics and hereditary factors
  • Viral or bacterial infections
  • Environmental factors like toxic chemicals and irritants

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS -

  • High viral fever
  • Rashes and peeling of skin in the toes and fingers
  • Joint pain and swelling
  • Red eyes
  • Inflamed glands in the neck
  • Irritation in the throat, inside the mouth and lips
  • Swollen, red tongue
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Jaundice
  • Lack of appetite

COMPLICATIONS –

  • Inflammation of heart muscle and vasculitis in the coronary arteries
  • Heart valve problems
  • Heart failure or heart attack

DIAGNOSIS -

  • Urine test
  • Blood test
  • Electrocardiogram is used to measure the electrical impulses of heartbeat.
  • Echocardiogram helps to identify abnormalities of coronary artery through ultra sound images.

TREATMENT -

  • Certain medications such as anticoagulant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulin and gamma globulin immune protein, corticosteroids etc.
  • Frequent checkup and monitoring of heart
  • Stent implantation
  • In severe case, coronary artery angioplasty is recommended

EPIDEMIOLOGY -

  • Children below 5 years of age are more vulnerable to Kawasaki disease.
  • Males are more prone to get affected than females.

Have any questions? or Need help Contact us – 022 6163 6163 | support@medicus.com

©2020 Copyright. All rights reserved. Powered by . Designed by Hats-Off

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?

Feedback