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Posted by -Dr-khanna

A To Z Disease Directory / 29 Jul 2019

TREMORS

ABSTRACT -

Tremors is a neurological disorder, causing spontaneous and recurring shaking movements in one part or one limb of the body. Any part of the body can get affected, but mostly the wavering occurs in the hands. This condition is not always serious but it might get worsen over time and can result in serious disorder.

Types –
  • Essential Tremor
  • Dystonic Tremor
  • Cerebellar Tremor
  • Psychogenic Tremor
  • Physiology Tremor
  • Enhanced Tremor
  • Parkinsonian Tremor
  • Orthostatic Tremor

CAUSES -

  • DNA Mutations
  • Tiredness in muscles
  • Too much intake of caffeine
  • Stress
  • Aging
  • Low level of blood sugar
  • Strokes
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Liver or kidney failure
  • Anxiety or panic attacks

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS –

  • Recurring movements or shaking of the hands, arms, head, legs or torso
  • Trembling or shaky voice
  • Obstacles during writing or drawing
  • Difficulty in holding or controlling the utensils properly
  • Emotional stress

DIAGNOSIS –

  • Physical examination
  • Neurological examination
  • Blood test
  • Urine test
  • Imaging test
  • Electromyogram to diagnose issues in muscles or nerves

TREATMENT –

  • Medications such as Botox injections, Anti-seizure etc
  • Ultrasound
  • Surgery such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)
  • Radiofrequency Ablation

EPIDEMIOLOGY –

  • The prevalence rate has been found to be in the range of 0.4% to 5.6% with incidence of 23.7 per 1, 00,000 among the total population worldwide.
  • Ageing plays the major role in getting affected from tremors and it prominently increases after the age of 40 and more.

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